Embracing Spontaneity By Discarding Life’s Presets

Photo by Michael Competielle

“Knobs and wires, parameters easily changed to create unique soundscapes once lost often impossible to replicate.”

Have you ever started writing the most amazing article, where every word feels just right in the assemblage? Your inner voice clear and detailed as you feel the rhythm of your thoughts translate to the computer screen. The genius of your work you’re certain will gain you a Best Selling Author title.

And then something happens, the data gremlin creeps into you’re computer and pulls the plug.

ddddrrrrreeeeewwwwuuuu you hear as your laptop goes into cardiac arrest and that godforsaken spinning beachball twirls around the page while your words are eaten like a starving Pacman. “WTF” you scream as you panic and hit every button and utter the only word that you can articulate “no, no, no” as you stare in horror at the screen like Max Renn in Videodrome.

Photo by Michael Competielle

“Save early and save often” my computer instructors would say. “Yeah yeah yeah, everything will be fine” I’d retort. Well, not this damn time. My brilliance diminished into the oblivion of my short term memory bank and a bunch of 1’s and 0’s amounting to zero-sum.

The Perfect Meal

Okay so maybe you’re not into modular synthesis or you’re one of those safety officer types that look both ways, doesn’t J-walk and covers their mouths with surgical masks when they have the sniffles. But I’ll guarantee your willingness to be calculated and rule-abiding tendencies can’t explain what happens when meals go wrong.

Okay, you marinated the ethically grown grass feed beef in certified organic Worcestershire sauce according to the latest Beef Afficiados Magazine’s top recipe. You observed the temperatures of your Mom’s Wolf stove with Dad’s digitally accurate to the nano-degree meat thermometer. The triple-ply All-Clad braising bathtub roasting pan slides into the oven and 45 minutes later. The meat just doesn’t taste right as the meat is tough and hard to chew. You eliminated all the variables and yet it still wasn’t quite right. Variables and life’s inconsistencies.

Shit Happens Bro

Okay, so what’s the point Mikey? As I’m certain I’ve lost everyone up to this point I with 100 percent certainty can say whatever the fuck I want.

Preprogrammed life sucks. Don’t do it. Forgo going to work for a great Corporation with great benefits and golden parachutes. Avoid buying into the false narrative of homeownership and 401k’s. Take some risks and have some adventures. Be spontaneous and whatever you do don’t be damn boring.

Join the startup and watch a business being built. If they succeed you’ll learn so much. If they fail, you’ll learn that too.

Don’t buy any furniture except used or Ikea. Anything else is a waste of cash.

Mindful Developments

I’m a work in progress however I’m currently selling off crap I own that I have hidden behind. Excuses for not being more creative and spontaneous. I’m not even close to achieving my goals but I will say it’s a refreshing feeling to move on and get rid of crap. I force myself to read web articles I’d otherwise save for another day. Or use the tools and equipment I previously wasn’t. And if I feel they are dull and uninspiring, I send them packing.

The culling of the herd of shit I’m hoping will bring me closer to the things I love and free me to be more adventurous as I embrace learning, experimenting and experiencing.

New connections and opportunities create a more complete and enlightened me. I’m modifying my lifestyle to allow for less guarantee and certainty that I’m thinking will create a more fulfilling life.

I’m feeling I can always go back to the safe path and follow in the footsteps of others, many of whom I see are sad, lonely and anxious. While not having an actual plan yields uncertainty on how I’ll move forward I feel it’ll necessitate the need to keep pushing on.

Daily I reflect back on my day. What did I photograph, write and experience? Could I sit down and tell an amazing story about my adventures? If not maybe it was another wasteful day, hiding behind my safety net.

A modular synthesizer with its knobs and wires lacks pre-programmed sounds. Putting a cable into a different signal path can yield new and unique sounds never witnessed. And if you don’t relish them at that moment, you’d better because if you turn one knob wrong and try to go back, you may get that sound but it may never be exacting. And actually you shouldn’t want that anyway. As new sounds and experiences are what makes us complete.

Finding Myself By Becoming Nomadic

Photo by Michael Competielle

Every morning I awaken with energy to make a change. I’ll try to make a difference in the world by questioning the status quo and attempting to make minor adjustments to my lifestyle to help save our planet.

My short drive to work I pass through small suburban developments of semi-manicured lawns and sidewalks. Some people will walk their dogs or go for a jog however just like me most everyone jumps into their cars and drives to work.

Very few homes including mine are even close to being carbon neutral. Our lawns and home designs don’t benefit our environment nor our needs beyond basic shelter. Gone are the agrarian days where our homes were also small farms where we would grow some fruits, vegetables and raise animals for food.

Prior to agrarian times, we lived a nomadic life. Traveling and foraging for foods to survive. For centuries various cultures survived living off the fruits of the land and their diets were based on the proximity to the foods available.

My favorite foods seem to come from warmer climates closer to the equator. Middle Eastern, Indian, Japanese, Peruvian foods and most importantly being a vegan all of those cultures have options.

My quest is to experience and witness how other cultures live and prosper. Can I witness and learn from the ambassadors of our land? Can I learn how the foods I love and enjoy are grown? Will I understand the supply chain of how those foods are transported to me in New Jersey?

Obtaining Enlightenment

I’m hoping that my travels will bring me to obscure places, guided by opportunities and happenstance. I’m hoping to learn new traditions and break bread with others after a day of wholesome hard work.

Would my soul become cleansed as I purify my mind? Will religious differences make more sense as I experience them in the environment? Can I expand my mindful meditation and enrich my existence?

As a nomad, you’d need to limit the number of personal possessions you travel with. What would my priorities actually be? Clothing, ways to document my travels, and ways to make a living.

How long would it take to obtain enlightenment is hard to guess however I visualize the process will begin the moment I leave to get on the plane. My nomadic travels are my goal and the narrative of my future.

Freelance as a Maker and Enter the Gig Economy

Photo by Michael Competielle

Why your best talent should be becoming an opportunist

Online retailer shops such as Etsy and Fiver are cool ways to make a buck using your talents and skills. Post your products or talents online and wait for the requests to roll in. Chances are you’ll be working or selling to people you’ve never met, quite possibly nor will you ever. Sort of like a One Hit Wonder (many of my favorite songs and artists fit this bill) often you’ll work for a client once and possibly never again. I feel it’s because you may not have made a personal connect.

I’m not saying Freelancer or Upwork can’t get you repeat business. I’m possibly suggesting it’s doubtful you can easily build a client rapport.

Imagine if we had to go to a job interview daily.

Anxious as we try to put out the best version of ourselves as we are questioned on our talents and abilities. We often know more than the interviewer does about our skill set.

In a time where large corporations are gobbling up startups and market disrupters at an alarming pace the opportunities to enter a workforce of gainful employment, get paid what your worth and achieve long term goals is diminishing.

Mounting college loan debt that is unsecured by an uncertain job market renders the foreseeable future as depressing.

With a compulsory educational system lacking in foresight of our future job market our trajectory is bleak. Removing basic life skills, vocational and hands on electives from most schools, students and young adults are struggling with many of the simplest knowledge or experiences.

Thinking back to my childhood I recall learning mechanical drafting and detailing, how to program a CNC router, culinary class, sewing, photography and film development, wood shop, small engine repair and basic electronics. And this was while I was in high school.

Working around the house on weekends with my dad, summers as an apprentice in the families cabinet shop and working with friends as we souped up our cars, we got dirty and learned to do shit.


Sitting on a bench at a horse farm in New Jersey watching my high school sweetheart practice relentlessly in preparation for the Metal Maclay competition I was approached by the head trainer asking me if I wanted to work on the farm caring for the horses. Having absolutely no knowledge, I agreed and learned quickly how to clean stalls, haying and watering, pick the horses feet, brush them and dress them in tack and blankets.

My experience there taught me the most important life skill ever….Talk to People, Take on Opportunities.

I talked to everyone…. and whom did I meet? A Wall Street broker. And what did she do for me? Introduced me to her computer programmer husband. And what door did that open? Sound engineering, MIDI programming, computer integration, all about Jazz, diversity in communities…. Etc etc. and I was 18.

Naim grew up in Harlem in the 1970’s. Poverty stricken in a declining City he knew he needed to get away. Working as a human billboard for a barber, he was approached by someone asking if he wanted to learn about computers. He was curious and signed up for a programming course and learned computer code.

By the time I met Naim he was living in a large suburban house in Central NJ working as a freelancing consultant for AT&T clocking in a hourly billable rate of over $200 per hour.

Inside the home was a separate wing with Naim’s recording studio which consisted of a live practice/ tracking room and a control room with the mixing console, 16 track reel to reel deck, racks of outboard gear and computers.

Meeting Naim for the first time we instantly connected, he threw me a set of keys, a security code for the studios alarm and a detailed list of instructions on the power up sequence of the studio and it’s gear. I was to start the following evening at 5pm powering up the studio, ushering in the guest musicians and tuning Naim’s guitars.

We would run late into the evening jamming on Soft Jazz tunes Naim played thru his guitars that housed specialized Midi pickups which ran thru a programmed foot switch back to racks of Roland samplers.

High tech for the early 90’s and outer space for an 18 year old kid.

One evening Naim left me a note not to power up the studio and that we were prepping for the following evenings gig in a Jazz club near Newark Airport. He stated it was an African American bar but I’d be alright because “Your with the band”.

I was actually more concerned with my age which the boys in the band sort of chuckled at. I realized later no one really cared.

The next evening I loaded the band truck with racks of gear and Naim and I headed to the club. It was an industrial part of town and the club was hard to recognize from the street.

We loaded in all the gear and I setup the rig as the rest of the band arrived. Big hugs from the guys and a pat on the back from Naim subdued my anxiety.

Crowds of people began to flow into the club, the lights dimmed and Naim and crew climbed onstage. I hung behind the mixing decks assuring a proper mix and prepping for any technical issues.

I began to fall into a trancelike state listening to the band in this dark smoke crowded room.

A gentleman asked me where was my hat as I looked back at him puzzled. He pulled off his cap, threw in a $20 and proceeded to pass it around the club. Minutes later he handed me a pile of cash and said “this is for the band”.

Later that evening as I was packing up gear I mentioned the pile of money that was for the band to Naim. He divvied up the cash and divided it evenly and handed me an equal share. I was puzzled and said “Naim that’s for the band” in which he responded “you are the band my Brother”.

To this day the story brings a tear to my eyes about my opportunity and subsequent acceptance.

Photo by Michael Competielle

Years later I still think back to that experience and how I’ve always taken every gig that came my way.


Throughout my years I’ve built stores, high end residences, galleries and hotels. I’ve detailed shop drawings for Millwork shops and steel fabricators. I’ve installed just about every material imaginable and I’m never afraid to jump in and help. I’ve finished concrete on huge pours by operating the bull float and hydrostatic trowel machines.

I’ve worked on farms, designed custom interiors, build custom millwork in a cabinet shop I owned. I’ve build monster trucks and SCCA racing cars. Worked in an aftermarket Porsche shop and I’ve made donuts, pastries and bread. I’ve delivered wedding cakes and newspapers. I’ve worked on and made corporate videos, short films, web series and feature films.

I’ve hedged economic downturns building decks in freezing temperates in January and February. I’ve shoveled snow, repaired vintage synthesizers, built recording studios, restored massive factory buildings, build polished concrete countertops. Fabricated and installed stainless steel kitchen cabinets.

I’ve done structured wiring, stage wiring and live sound gigs. Soon I’ll publish my first book and start filming my own feature length documentary. I’ve worked in biker bars as a bouncer and loaded tractor trailers with electronics.

Most of these gigs have lead me to more. Most of these gigs have built my confidence that I can do just about anything. I’m always looking for new opportunities to expand my horizons, make a few bucks and meet some new people.

Freelancers often feel trapped in there own world often working in solitude. It could be that person next to you on line in Starbucks or on a park bench in Central Park.

Talk to people and take on new rolls and experiences. Help load in at a trade show or become a brand ambassador for a startup brand. Learn to become a barista or frame pictures.

Freelancing as a maker helps build your network of clients, expands your available talents and excites your creativity.

Trending in incubator spaces, co-working and maker spaces allows freelancers and makers abilities to obtain access to office space, filming locations, shop space with tools and equipment and retail space.

Photo by Michael Competielle

https://medium.com/@mcompetielle/freelance-as-a-maker-and-enter-the-gig-economy-af3f0c7836cd?source=friends_link&sk=5434fd55c819bd8b8e1eacafbb20eabf

Costa Rica’s Biodiversity My Introduction Into a Vegan Lifestyle

photo by Michael Competielle

A few years ago good friends of my wife and I invited us to accompany them on a trip to Costa Rica. Having never been there before, we certainly were up for the trip and quickly agreed, excited to explore the known to be lovely Central American country. La Costa Rica means “rich coast” with a long and skinny landmass flanked on either side by the Caribbean Sea and the North Pacific Ocean. With over 800 miles of coastline and a northern border with Nicaragua and Panama to the south Costa Rica is Tropical paradise known for its biodiversity.

According to the Happy Planet Index Costa Rica is the happiest and most sustainable country on the planet. With the coastal plains separated by rugged mountainous regions the country is home to over half a million species of which 70% are insects. According to INBio Costa Rica consists of 4.5% of the worlds biodiversity with 12,119 species of plants of which 950 are endemic.

Photo by Michael Competielle

Landing in San Jose we headed to the rental car agent and procured our necessary 4 wheel drive SUV to climb the dirt road to our villa in the mountains above the Southern Pacific coast.

With our GPS plugged in and programmed we started our 2 hour trek down to Costa Rica’s Southern Pacific Coast. With surprisingly well build and smooth roads we headed through the lush mountains to to the Pacific coast and headed south towards Quepos and followed the Pacific coast. We passed through the town of Dominical a surfers hamlet known for year round waves.

We eventually arrived into the Village of Uvita known for the Envision Festival as well as wildlife and nature. Our friends received the keys for our villa named Casa Aracari located 400 feet above the stunning whales tail in the Marino Bellana National Park.

The mountainous dirt road was heavily rutted from the recent rainy season. In four wheel low we slowly climbed the rugged terrain passing the poshKura Resort and for one week our next door neighbor. Opening our private gates we pulled up to the breathtaking property.

With a mixture of tropical plants and hardscaping we followed the gravel driveway to the charming yellow masonry home. Accented with thick beams and slabs of local teak, Saltillo tiles floors lead out to the patio and private infinity pool overlooking the Pacific coastline below.

Ceiling fans cooled the space while the topmost wall areas had screened in pillars to exhaust the days heat. Sounds of birds, insects and monkeys could be heard during the warm quiet evenings.

Photo by Michael Competielle

After unpacking we decided to head back down the arduous mountain into the quaint village below. On a local corner we met Emmanuel a produce merchant that loaded the entire rear of our SUV with fresh watermelon, mangoes, papaya, oranges, pineapples and bananas.

The local grocery provided the essential coconut water, rice, coffee, eggs and bread. Surprisingly the markets fish and meats were less than desirable.

Over the next few days we traveled the beautiful countries jungles, oceans and villages. Examining much of Costa Rica’s lovely flora and animal life we never knew what to expect.

Photo by Michael Competielle

As always I researched before we had left for the trip understanding the Tico way of life, Pura Vida. We made fresh mango salsas with yellow rice and lime soaked plantains from our properties trees and fresh tropical drinks from coconuts that had fallen by the pool and papaya cocktails…we were in heaven.

We ventured into Dominical the surfers enclave for local art pieces, food and bath products in Mama Toucan’s organic health food store. We also were in search of fresh fish which we ultimately purchased from a local fish monger I ordered in my broken Spanish “se vende pescado?” Which he replied “si” with a large cleaver in hand. We purchased two large fresh red snappers that created the evenings rice, beans and fish dish.

Traveling the lovely coastal country we came upon large palm oil farmsalong with black smokey palm oil polluting the air from the palm oil extraction process. The palm trees planted near Quepos and Jaco were know to have been responsible for ruining the areas biodiversity by killimg off what once was the once jungles lower canopy. Small shanty homes cropped up around the plantations roads provided housing for the local farm hands.

In our adventures we saw the countries native born Tico way of life. Pleasant and respectful people that cherished the land and the maintenance of the large abundance of plant and animal life.

My friend a bit more of a meat lover than I was hoping we could find him some decent steaks. In our ventures we would see the Brahman cows known to survive well in arid terrain but looks less than desirable than the New York strip steaks we were accustomed to, we passed living almost entirely on fruits, vegetables and some fish.

Photo by Michael Competielle

One afternoon we headed to a local artists home/ studio. Mel and Misha living in a cute home less than a quarter mile from the Marino Bellena beach. We talked art, Costa Rica’s culture, local living, and Misha’s computer business. They offered some homemade ice creams they made from coconut they collected on the beaches and laughed how we’d paid for fruits we could’ve collected freely in the nearby jungles.

We talked about Costa Rica’s beef which Misha informed us wasn’t like our Jersey cows however some Tico farmers were now raising them. He mentioned a meat market in town that imported the ever coveted NY strip steaks where we headed off and purchased.

To be honest the meat wasn’t the same and seemed almost unnecessary after the bulk of the weeks delicious plant and fish based offerings. We loved our travels to Costa Rica certain we would certainly return.

Heading back to the States my wife and I made a conscious decision to attempt to maintain our Costa Rican diet once home. Upon entering the local New Jersey markets we laughed at the inadequate offerings of tropical fruits and vegetables in November compared to the quality. And quantity eaten on our recent journey.

We continued on a with a Pescatarian lifestyle for the next few years and very infrequently eating meats. Since that time we’ve become Vegan, examined biodiverse farming and Costa Rican life. Once again to return as Vegans living on the fruits of paradise.

Michael Competielle

https://medium.com/@mcompetielle/costa-ricas-biodiversity-my-introduction-into-a-vegan-lifestyle-a89ae6ca8c9?source=friends_link&sk=4506e61bf46796e67183eff94c84adbf

Visualize Your Design and Build It Backwards Without Compromise

Photo by Michael Competielle

My cellphone rings the Friday prior to a July 4th weekend as I was requested to visit an active project of Madison and 5th Avenue on the Upper East Side of New York City. The project was an aggressive renovation of a historic Brownstone nestled quietly on a prestigious residential block of mansions occupied by Donatella Versace, Edgar Bronfman Jr., Tommy Mottola, and Ivana Trump.

The project was to create a modern gallery space adorned with floating white lacquered walls, polished white quartz agglomerate floors and seamless coved ceilings with adjustable recessed lighting troughs. Three adjoining buildings were being undermined as entire sections of brownstone and bricks were pinned and removed to create large open expanses vertically and lengthwise.

The projects design was stunningly original and bold and certainly right up my alley however I currently was a full time supervisor of a high end architectural interiors company so my time was well occupied. Not wanting to loose out on the experience and challenge I asked my friend the projects supervisor what was the estimated completion date in which his response was Mid October to coincide with the International Fine Art and Antique Dealers Show.

With an impossible schedule of little more than three months I laughed and boldly stated to my friend and colleague entrusted with the responsibility of completing this project this was definitely impossible. Secretly my own internal thought was due to scheduling conflicts I wouldn’t be able to help build this amazingly chic space.

My laugh and comment was responded to by an Italian statuesque and charismatic handsome man in a high fashion designer suit. His smile and presence commanded my fullest attentiveness as I hung on his every word. He played to my masculine ego noting he had heard that I was the one person that could get this project done.

As an overly confident decision maker I quickly decided I could take on this projects aggressively short schedule and extreme detail under certain conditions. First I couldn’t leave my existing project until it was closer to completion and my entire crew would need to come along with me and only for the rates I requested and therefore the job would need to operate round the clock and seven days a week. In order to supervision I would need to live onsite and I would build our portion of the project as a second job.

The owner/designer agreed to all of my terms and offered his 5th ave apartment as suitable sleeping quarters which I firmly denied. The only way I felt I could build this project, I had to sleep onsite inspired by a close friends father who was the lead surveyor in the building of New Jersey’s Great Adventure theme park. He lived in a job site trailer awakened every few hours to provide points and elevations for the various trades to keep the project moving round the clock.

My closest friend Mark was to be my lead carpenter and stay onsite with me as we undertook what seemed to be the impossible.

My requests were immediately accepted by a smile and the owner calling his staff ordered mattresses and Egyptian cotton bedding for my what would prove to be a less than peaceful job site quarters. Uncertain to what challenging circumstances I had just committed my crew and friends too I began to review the projects piles of detailed architectural drawings.

Upon removing and repositioning some of the buildings structural loads and foundations we were to frame floating drywall partitions backlit with low voltage festoon bulbs. Horizontal reveals ran vertically around the space with integral art hanging systems for the soon to be hanging Lichtenstein and Warhol’s. Leveled mud beds were to be set to hold the expansive slabs of white marblesque quartz.

Hundreds of recessed art lights incrementally placed in the high ceiling were to be controlled by a single switch at the entryway programmed to control the various light scenes dependent on the spaces current use. Small slots were to be run around the space to provide the necessary proper climate for 18th century Rococo antiques to be placed on internally lit Plexiglass totems.

Reviewing the painstakingly detailed drawings with the Owner and head architect the design and vision became focused and clear like a Baroque painting. The juxtaposition of modern clean bright white space adorned with modern paintings and antiquities of province.

As we talked and the project explained to me I was excited and charged. Sitting in a chair listening to the vision and details I began to hear the electronica music playing thru the invisible recessed speaker system as I sipped a martini discussing the seamless stainless steel cyclone stairs. I clearly saw the completed vision.

And then my heart sunk….the music stopped and my brain began to race. The details of custom brass door hardware from New York’s only remaining foundry mounted to the massively thick reclaimed door I began to see the project challenges.

Where was the massive amounts of required ductwork and mechanical equipment. How do you have tens of thousands of watts of lights powered from only one switch. How do you get a one piece thousands of pounds stainless steel corkscrew cyclone stair into the buildings historic facade.

As I asked my new designer boss the technical questions that would certainly make my job almost impossible to achieve he responded with the secret to design and project execution…. “You visualize it done and work backwards from there”. In which I boldly responded “some of these things are almost impossible” and his response is “ Michael never compromise. If you need to…break the rules.” And with that he stood up, gave my sinking shoulders a pat and stated “ I’ve 100% faith you won’t let me down”.

And then I didn’t see him for weeks. Off he was traveling the world designing and creating some of the worlds most renowned spaces. And me… I went to work.

I give you all that you want

Take the skin and peel it back

Now doesn’t that make you feel better

Trent Reznor

As a leader of men I decided to make this happen. My future path as a designer and creative clearly laid before me and I saw the vision in its completed form. But how to get there….

Never tell people how to do things. Tell them what to do and they will surprise you with their ingenuity.

General George Patton

Calculating lighting loads and BTU’s I worked with Lutron and mechanical engineers arguing that what they deemed not feasible in reality was absolutely possible.

Requesting special considerations from New York City Landmarks and the building department while kindly requesting from the blocks influential neighbors to bear with to endless noise and deliveries. Feeding the parking meters nonstop for our materials and dumpsters taking up precious parking spaces, we sidestepped the rules.

Pushing the boundaries of the materials and the crew we continued to trudge on. When moral was down and tempers flailed I would again remind people of what we were building and why and to keep the eye on the prize. The projects vision.

“Nothing is Impossible”

Kevin Roberts CEO Saatchi and Saatchi

Months went by and the building continued as materials were ordered and installed. Mistakes were made and remedied as we integrated Architectural details with behind the scenes infrastructure. Audio visuals structure cabling ran alongside climate controls and low voltage light feeds. The never ending octopus properly labeled and diagrammed for the necessary programming and commissioning of the equipment. Daily I would answer questions on details with clarity and confidence as I often solely understood the full picture.

With perseverance of the owners team of architects, designers and contractors and we saw we were gradually came to completion. The owners visits became slightly more frequent as the project was finalizing and he was able to display his forte…. The final execution of the vision.

Walls were dry walled and level 5 skim coated under raking light. Gloss white lacquer paint applied in continuous coats to maintain a wet edge. Lighting scenes were programmed into the Graphik Eye lighting system as the floors were sealed and polished.

Moving and delivery trucks lined the streets and Starfire glass was installed around antique colonnade tables. Modern art was hung from the specialty art hanging system to minimize wall damages. And Yves Klein coffee table appeared and carefully placed as experts installed the Yves Klein blue pigment. Caterers loading the space with glasses and wine for the grand gala.

Dressed in my best Purple-label Ralph Lauren I watched as some of the worlds top designers, collectors and celebrities entered the packed gallery. Often I checked for the expression of the owner, the master planner and designer who visualized this event and built the space specifically for it. Never once was he asked to compromise his design or vision and never once did he change his mind.

To this day I owe him for my understanding of vision and compromise. My abilities to see what isn’t there however…. someday it will. Walking away from the experience I’ve learned how to fight and how to win by keeping my eye on the prize….The Vision.

https://medium.com/@mcompetielle/visualize-your-design-and-build-it-backwards-without-compromise-905660ab5473?source=friends_link&sk=26ad26bbc9ddd4ca62fd99bb040e502f